Caleb Harris: Why don’t people vote?

v2In America, we vote for a new president every four years. In other countries voting is more important. Not many Americans are voting, many people want change, but most people aren’t willing to vote.

According to pewresearch.org:

Only about 65 percent of the U.S. voting-age population is registered, but in Sweden 96 percent and 93 percent in the U.K.

In the United States, the voting turnout in 2008 was 62%. Although, according to some research, Americans are the worst at voting, but we’re not the best. We vote to make a change, but how can we make a change if not enough people vote?

vote-counts1Could it be that there is a massive income gap between the wealthy and the poor? In 2012, only 48 percent of people in low-income households under $20,000 voted. Meanwhile, people who live in households with more than $75,000 was at 77 percent.

There are many reasons why people don’t vote, including laziness, being too busy, bad weather, and not knowing enough about any of the candidates. Voters have been split up into four categories: Regular, Intermittent, Registered but rare voters, and Unregistered adults. Intermittent voters are bored with politics. Regular voters are more likely than intermittent voters to say they have been contacted by a candidate or political group encouraging them to vote.

Nonvoters tend to say voting will not change anything. They may not be not politically informed. Nineteen percent of Unregistered voters say they have not had time to register, while nearly as many said they had recently moved. Fourteen percent say they don’t care about politics, while nearly as many express little confidence in our government.

Then, too, the turnout rate for high school graduates in 1986 was about 42 percent. In 2014, that  dropped to 30 percent. Turnout for post-graduate students in 1986 was about 70 percent; in 2014, that dropped to 60 percent.

Finally, many people need to believe that America can change if they go out and vote. It’s hard to think about that while living in a low-income household and suffering from a lack of education around politics, but not voting will not make anything easier.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s